Category Archives: General Knowledge

Agent Orange Ship List

Navy and Coast Guard Ships Associated with Service in Vietnam and Exposure to Herbicide Agents

 

 Courtesy VA https://www.benefits.va.gov/compensation/claims-postservice-agent_orange.asp

Navy and Coast Guard Ships Associated with Service in Vietnam and Exposure to Herbicide Agents

September 4, 2018

Background

This ships list is intended to provide VA regional offices with a resource for determining whether a particular US Navy or Coast Guard Veteran of the Vietnam era is eligible for the presumption of Agent Orange herbicide exposure based on operations of the Veteran’s ship.

According to 38 CFR § 3.307(a)(6)(iii), eligibility for the presumption of Agent Orange exposure requires that a Veteran’s military service involved “duty or visitation in the Republic of Vietnam” between January 9, 1962 and May 7, 1975. This includes service within the country of Vietnam itself or aboard a ship that operated on the inland waterways of Vietnam. However, this does not include service aboard a large ocean-going ship that operated only on the offshore waters of Vietnam, unless evidence shows that a Veteran went ashore. Inland waterways include rivers, canals, estuaries, and deltas. They do not include open deep-water bays and harbors such as those at Da Nang Harbor, Qui Nhon Bay Harbor, Nha Trang Harbor, Cam Ranh Bay Harbor, Vung Tau Harbor, or Ganh Rai Bay. These are considered to be part of the offshore waters of Vietnam because of their deep-water anchorage capabilities and open access to the South China Sea.

In order to promote consistent application of the term “inland waterways”, VA has determined that Ganh Rai Bay and Qui Nhon Bay Harbor are no longer considered to be inland waterways, but rather are considered open water bays. This is a change from previous policy. As of February 2, 2016, new ships will not be added to the list based on operations in those locations and no additional dates for operations in those locations will be added to those ships already on the list. Veterans who served aboard ships already on the list for those locations will retain the presumption of Agent Orange exposure. New Veteran claimants who were aboard ships in those locations, during the dates already on the list, will also qualify for the presumption of exposure. This presumption will extend to all future disability claims from these Veterans. However, Veterans who were aboard ships in those locations, during new dates not currently on the list, will not qualify for the presumption. Likewise, Veterans aboard new ships in those locations will not qualify for the presumption of exposure. Courtesy Vietnam Veterans News

Ship Categories

The list contains five categories of ships that operated on the waters of Vietnam. A Ship is placed on this list when documentary evidence shows that it fits into a particular category. The required evidence can come from an official ship history, deck logs, cruise books, Captain’s letters, or similar documents. A specific ship may be listed in more than one category, based on its activities. Evidence requirements for the presumption of Agent Orange exposure may vary depending on what dates the Veteran was aboard and what ship activity occurred on those dates. Ship categories include:

I. Ships operating primarily or exclusively on Vietnam’s inland waterways
This category includes smaller naval vessels involved with patrolling and interdicting enemy activity on the inland waterways of Vietnam. It also includes ships supplying and supporting those operations. Examples of such vessels include swift boats, river patrol boats, and LSTs [landing ship, tank]. The inland waterways are often referred to as “brown waters” because of their muddy color and the naval vessels operating on them are referred to as the Brown Water Navy and/or the Mobile Riverine Force. All Veterans who served aboard these vessels are eligible for the presumption of Agent Orange exposure because their primary service was on the inland waterways of Vietnam.

II. Ships operating temporarily on Vietnam’s inland waterways
This category includes large ocean-going ships that operated primarily on Vietnam’s offshore waters for gunfire support of ground operations and interdiction of enemy vessels travelling along coastal waters. It also includes ships supplying and supporting these operations. Examples of such vessels include destroyers, cruisers, and cargo ships. The deep offshore waters are often referred to as “blue waters” and naval vessels operating on them are referred to as the Blue Water Navy. Ships in this category entered Vietnam’s inland waterways temporarily as part of their gunfire, interdiction, or support missions. All Veterans who served aboard these vessels at the time of entry into Vietnam’s inland waterways are eligible for the presumption of Agent Orange exposure.

III. Ships that docked to shore or pier in Vietnam
This category includes large ocean-going ships of the Blue Water Navy that entered an open water harbor and docked to a pier or otherwise docked to the shore of Vietnam. As a result of this docking, it is assumed that crewmembers had the opportunity to go ashore for a work detail or for liberty leave. Therefore, any Veteran aboard the ship at the time of docking will be eligible for the presumption of exposure if that Veteran provides a lay statement of personally going ashore.

IV. Ships operating on Vietnam’s close coastal waters for extended periods with evidence that crew members went ashore
This category includes large ocean-going ships of the Blue Water Navy that conducted a variety of missions along the close coastal waters of Vietnam for extended periods of time. Documentary evidence has been obtained for all ships in this category showing that some crewmembers actually went ashore. Examples of such vessels include hospital ships, harbor repair ships, mine sweepers, and seaplane tenders. Also included are combat ships, such as destroyers, when evidence shows that crewmembers went ashore. Because shore activity of some crewmembers has been documented, any Veteran aboard the ship at the time of documented shore activity will be eligible for the presumption of exposure if that Veteran provides a lay statement of personally going ashore.

V. Ships operating on Vietnam’s close coastal waters for extended periods with evidence that smaller craft from the ship regularly delivered supplies or troops ashore
This category includes large ocean-going ships of the Blue Water Navy that conducted supply missions to Vietnam or transported troops into and out of the country through use of smaller landing craft housed within the mother ship. Examples of such vessels include attack cargo ships, amphibious attack transports, and landing ship docks. The smaller landing vessels within these ships required a crew of from 3 to 14, depending on size, as they ferried supplies or troops to and from shore. Although official documents show that some crewmembers went ashore with the landing craft, they do not generally provide the names of these crewmembers. Additionally, many of these ships are listed for extended time frames because they routinely travelled back and forth between the US and Vietnam, and between Vietnam and other Asian Pacific ports, as they delivered supplies and troops to Vietnam. Therefore, military records should be checked to ensure that the Veteran was aboard when the ship was in Vietnamese waters (as shown by a PIES O34 request).
Any Veteran aboard the mother ship during the time frame of offshore Vietnam landing craft activity will be eligible for the presumption of exposure if that Veteran provides a lay statement of personally going ashore with the landing craft.

Locating Ships on the List

In addition to its name, all US Navy and Coast Guard vessels are assigned letters and numbers, usually painted on the forward hull of the ship, that identify the ship type and the numerical order in which it was built. Ships on this list are arranged by these letter-number designations. Vessels within each category are arranged alphabetically by the ship type letter designations and then numerically by hull numbers within that ship type. As an example, for the USS Ingersoll (DD-652), “DD” represents the “destroyer” ship type and the number shows that this is the 652nd destroyer built for sea service. A computer search for specific ship names or letter-number designations can be done with the “Find” function located in the drop down menu of the toolbar “Edit” function.

This list is evolving and is not complete. Therefore, the presumption of Agent Orange exposure should not be denied solely because the Veteran’s ship is not on this list. All development described in the procedures manual should be followed in cases involving ship activity, including sending a request to the Army and Joint Services Records Research Center for review of deck logs. When regional office personnel obtain evidence showing that a ship fits into any of these categories, the evidence should be forwarded to the Compensation Service Agent Orange Mailbox so that the ship can be added to the list [VAVBAWAS/CO/211/AGENTORANGE].

AGENT ORANGE SHIP LIST

 

I. Ships operating primarily or exclusively on Vietnam’s inland waterways

All vessels referred to in military records as part of the “Mobile Riverine Force”

All vessels with the designation AGP [Assault Group Patrol/Patrol Craft Tender]

All vessels with the designation LCM [Landing Craft, Mechanized]

All vessels with the designation LCU [Landing Craft, Utility]

All vessels with the designation LCVP [Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel]

All vessels with the designation LST [Landing Ship, Tank]

All vessels with the designation PBR [Patrol Boat, River]

All vessels with the designation PCF [Patrol Craft, Fast or Swift Boat]

All vessels with the designation STABS [Strike Assault Boats]

All vessels with the designation YFU [Harbor Utility Craft]

All U.S. Coast Guard Cutters with hull designation WPB [Patrol Boat], WHEC [High Endurance Cutter], WLB [Buoy Tender], and WAK [Cargo Vessel] during their Vietnam tours

All vessels of Inshore Fire Support [IFS] Division 93, including:
USS Carronade (IFS 1)
USS Clarion River (LSMR 409) [Landing Ship, Medium, Rocket]
USS Francis River (LSMR 525)
USS White River (LSMR 536)

All vessels with hull designation PG [Patrol Gunboat], including:
USS Asheville (PG-84)
USS Gallop (PG-85)
USS Antelope (PG-86)
USS Ready (PG-87)
USS Crockett (PG-88)
USS Marathon (PG-89)
USS Canon (PG-90)
USS Welch (PG-93)

USS Mark (AKL-12) [Light Cargo Ship]
USS Brule (AKL-28)

USS Cohoes (AN-78) [Net laying ship]

USS Patapsco (AOG-1) [Gasoline Tanker]
USS Elkhorn (AOG-7)
USS Genesee (AOG-8)
USS Kishwaukee (AOG-9)
USS Tombigbee (AOG-11)
USS Noxubee (AOG-56)

USS Montrose (APA-212) [Attack Transport]
USS Okanogan (APA-220)
USS Bexar (APA-237)

USS Benewah (APB-35) [Self-Propelled Barracks Ship]
USS Colleton (APB-36)
USS Mercer (APB-39)
USS Nueces (APB-40)

Barracks Barge (APL-26) [Sleeping Quarters]
Barracks Barge (APL-30)

USS Tutuila (ARG-4) [Repair Ship]

USS Satyr (ARL-23) [Repair Ship]
USS Sphinx (ARL-24)
USS Askari (ARL-30)
USS Indra (ARL-37)
USS Krishna (ARL-38)

USS Belle Grove (LSD-2) [Landing Ship Dock]
USS Comstock (LSD-19)
USS Tortuga (LSD-26)

Floating Base Platform (YRBM-16) [Repair, Berthing, and Messing Barge]
Floating Base Platform (YRBM-17)
Floating Base Platform (YRBM-18)
Floating Base Platform (YRBM-20)
Floating Base Platform (YRBM-21)
USN Harbor Tug 84 (YTB-84)
USN Harbor Tug 85 (YTB-85)
USN Winnemucca (YTB-785)
USS Kalispell (YTB-784)

II. Ships operating temporarily on Vietnam’s inland waterways

USS Card (ACV-11) [Escort Aircraft Carrier] mined, sunk, and salvaged in Saigon River Harbor during May 1964

USS Core (ACV-13) travelled on Saigon River to delivered aircraft to Saigon during June 1965

USS Bennington (CVS-20) [Anti-Submarine Aircraft Carrier] entered Qui Nhon Bay Harbor to pick up Bob Hope for onboard Christmas show on December 26, 1966

USS Surfbird (ADG-383) [Degaussing Ship] conducted anti-mine degaussing operation for ships on Qui Nhon Bay during November 1967 and August 1969 (see other category)

USS Wrangell (AE-12) [Auxiliary Explosive, Ammunition Ship] entered Mekong River Delta to supply ammunition for US Coast Guard vessel on November 21, 1968

USS Firedrake (AE-14) operated on Ganh Rai Bay during April 1966

USS Pictor (AF-54) [Auxiliary Stores Ship] entered Cua Viet River while delivering supplies to Dong Ha during September 1967 (see other category)

USS Vega (AF-59) conducted resupply operations on Mekong River Delta September 13, 1966 (see other category)

USS Mars (AFS-1) [Combat Stores Ship] operated on Mekong River July 8, 1966

USS Niagara Falls (AFS-3) unloaded supplies on Saigon River and Cam Ranh Bay, April 22-25, 1968

USS Arikara (ATF-98) [Fleet Ocean Tug] assisted with salvage operations on Saigon River during August 1966 (see other category)

USS Estes (AGC-12) [Amphibious Force Flagship] entered Qui Nhon Bay during June 1965 and anchored in Mekong River during January 1967 (see other category)

USS Tanner (AGS-15) [Mapping Survey Ship] conducted surveys of Mekong River Delta and other coastal areas and rivers from October 1966 through 1968

USS Maury (AGS-16) conducted surveys of Mekong River Delta and other coastal areas and rivers from November 1965 through 1969

USS Sheldrake (AGS-19) conducted sounding surveys of Vietnam coastal and inland waterways October 1967 through March 1968

USS Serrano (AGS-24) conducted mapping surveys of Mekong River Delta and other coastal and river areas from 1966 through 1969

USS Towhee (AGS-28) conducted sounding surveys of Vietnam coastal and inland waterways October 1967 through March 1968

USS Rehoboth (AGS-50) conducted hydrographic survey of Mekong River Delta area during December 1965
USS Merrick (AKA-97) [Attack Cargo Ship] participated in Operation Jackstay amphibious landings while on Saigon River during March 1966 (see other category)

USS Seminole (AKA/LKA-104) [Attack/Amphibious Cargo Ship] docked in Saigon during July 1962; operated on Saigon River channel on March 4, 1967; and entered Cua Viet River on May 26, 1967 (see other category)

USS Union (AKA/LKA-106) anchored in Hue River while conducting operations during April 1965 (see other category)

USS St. Louis (AKA/LKA-116) operated on Ganh Rai Bay during March 9, 1971 (see other category)

USS Pollux (AKS-4) [General Stores Ship] delivered supplies while in Ganh Rai Bay on April 4. 1966, June 14, August 16, and October 31, 1967, and January 5, March 14, April 5, May 29, June 18, August 5, and October 10, 1968

USS Guadalupe (AO-32) [Oiler] operated on Ganh Rai Bay during April 1966

USS Kennebec (AO-36) provided fuel to vessels while in Ganh Rai Bay during August 1969

USS Ponchatoula (AO-148) operated on Mekong River Delta during July 1971(see other category)

USS George Clymer (APA-27) [Amphibious Attack Transport] navigated Saigon River to Saigon Port during January 1963 (see other category)

USS Calvert (APA-32) entered Qui Nhon Bay during October 1965 (see other category)

USS Cavalier (APA-37) entered Qui Nhon Bay on February 2, 1968 (see other category)

USS Magoffin (APA-199) entered Qui Nhon Bay to offload troops during October 23-24, 1965 (see other category)

USS Talladega (APA-208) operated on Saigon River during October 1967

USS Navarro (APA-215) transported Thai “Queen’s Cobras” troops from Thailand to Saigon via Saigon River during September 1967 (see other category)

USS Okanogan (APA-220) navigated Saigon River to Saigon for delivery of Thai troops during August 1968 (see other category)

USS Pickaway (APA-222) operated on Rung Sat Special Zone from March 31 to April 5, 1966 (see other category)

USS Paul Revere (APA-248) assisted with salvage of the USS Card (ACV-11) in Saigon Harbor on Saigon River during May 1964 and transported Korean troops through Qui Nhon Bay during October-November 1965 (see other category)

USS Weiss (APD/LPR-135) [High Speed Transport/Small Amphibious Transport] conducted operations in the Saigon River from March 1 to 18, 1963, and later conducted inland waterway troop-landing operations with Marine and SEAL units at various locations in the Mekong River Delta, Rung Sat Special Zone, and Saigon River and routinely surveyed river mouths and canal entrances for amphibious landings from November 1965 through February 1969

USS Markab (AR-23) [Repair Ship] conducted repair operations on Ganh Rai Bay during November 1967

USS Current (ARS-22) [Salvage Ship] conducted salvage operations on Saigon River during July 1964 and April 1967 and Qui Nhon Bay during May 1967 and August 1971

USS Grasp (ARS-24) conducted salvaging operations on Song Cua Dia River and other inland waters from February through April 1969

USS Safeguard (ARS-25) operated on Ganh Rai Bay and Mekong River Delta during December 8, 1965 (see other category)

USS Bolster (ARS-38) crew operated on land to extract USS Clark County (LST-601) from beach after grounding at Duc Pho from November 18 to December 1, 1967

USS Reclaimer (ARS-42) operated in Saigon Harbor to salvage USS Card (ACV-11) from sinking in Saigon River during May 1964 and in Rung Sat Special Zone of Mekong River Delta salvaging ships during early 1966

USS Chanticleer (ASR-7) [Submarine Rescue/Salvage Ship] traveled up the Saigon River and docked at Saigon during February 1963

USS Tillamook (ATA-192) [Auxiliary Ocean Tug] operated on Qui Nhon Bay during April 1965 and on Long Tau branch of Saigon River during January 1966

USS Mahopac (ATA-196) moored in Saigon during October 6-9, 1965, and operated on Mekong River from October 30-November 3, 1966

USS Mataco (ATF-86) [Fleet Ocean Tug] provided tow on Saigon River and delivered vessels to inland river base at Nha Be during June-August 1968 (see other category)

USS Tawasa (ATF-92) moored in Saigon from June 30 – July 4, 1964

USS Moctobi (ATF-105) provided tow on Saigon River with deliveries to inland river base at Nha Be during September-October 1967

USS Quapaw (ATF-110) provided tow on Saigon River with deliveries to inland river base at Nha Be during June 1966

USS Tawakoni (ATF-114) operated in Saigon Harbor to salvage USS Card (ACV-11) from sinking in Saigon River during May 1964

USS Currituck (AV-7) [Sea Plane Tender] travelled up Saigon River to Saigon during early 1964 and operated in Mekong River Delta during June 1965 (see other category)

USS Newport News (CA-148) [Heavy Cruiser] operated on Song Huong Estuary during February 1968 and on Mekong River Delta in vicinity of Vinh Binh Province during December 1968

USS Canberra (CAG-2) [Guided Missile Cruiser] operated on Saigon River from March 31 through April 1, 1966, on Mekong Delta Ham Luong River during January 15, 1967, and on Cua Viet River ( Song Thach Han) during December 10, 1968 (see other category)

USS Oklahoma City (CLG-5) [Light Guided Missile Cruiser] docked in Saigon during 21-24 July 1964 and operated in the mouth of the Thach Han River during July 20-21, 1966 (see other category)

USS Providence (CLG-6) operated on Saigon River 3 days during January 1964, on Song Huong (Perfume River) during February 15, 1968, and on Cua Viet River during August 1972

USS Radford (DD-446) [Destroyer] operated on Ganh Rai Bay and Saigon River during December 1967

USS Nicholas (DD-449) [Destroyer] operated on Ganh Rai Bay during April 1965, Mekong River Delta during January 1967, and Ganh Rai Bay and Mekong River Delta during August 1968

USS O’Bannon (DD-450) operated on Saigon River during May 22-24, 1966

USS Taylor (DD-468) operated on Ganh Rai Bay during August 1967 and November-December 1968

USS Conway (DD-507) operated on Saigon River during early August 1966

USS Cony (DD-508) operated on Ganh Rai Bay during November 6-7, 1967

USS Walker (DD-517) operated on inland waterway near Chu Lai during April 1966, on Mekong River during May 1967, and Saigon River during December 1968

USS Mullany (DD-528) entered Qui Nhon Bay during June 1965

USS Prichett (DD-561) operated on Mekong River Delta in September 1966 and operated on Mekong River Delta and Saigon River during August 1969

USS Stoddard (DD-566) operated on Saigon River during September 1965

USS Sproston (DD-577) operated on Mekong River Delta and Ganh Rai Bay during January 1966

USS Ingersoll (DD-652) operated on Saigon River October 24-25, 1965

USS Black (DD-666) operated on Saigon River during February 1965, Qui Nhon Bay during June 1965, and Saigon River during July 1966

USS Hopewell (DD-681) operated on Mekong River Delta during June 15-16, 1966

USS Picking (DD-685) operated on Saigon River during November 16, 1965

USS Uhlmann (DD-687) entered Qui Nhon Bay during June 1965

USS Ault (DD-698) operated on Mekong River Delta and Soirap River during May 26, 1967

USS Ingraham (DD-694) operated 10 miles up Saigon River on November 12, 1965

USS Charles S. Sperry (DD-697) operated on Saigon River during December 1965 (see other category)

USS Hugh Purvis (DD-709) operated on Qui Nhon Bay during January 1969

USS Wiltsie (DD-716) operated on Saigon River during July 1966 (see other category)

USS Hamner (DD-718) operated on Song Lon Tao and Long Song Tao Rivers, August 15-September 1, 1966; and on Song Gga in Rung Sat Special Zone November 14-15, 1967 (see other category)

USS Epperson (DD-719) operated on Qui Nhon Bay during November 1965 (see other category)

USS Walke (DD-723) operated on Mekong River Delta during September 2, 1969

USS De Haven (DD-727) operated on Saigon River during early March 1967

USS Mansfield (DD-728) entered mouth of Mekong River on November 29, 1965, and operated on Saigon River August 8-19, 1966 and December 21-24, 1969

USS Lyman K. Swenson (DD-729) traveled up Saigon River for a four-day visit to Saigon during May 1964

USS Collett (DD-730) provided naval gunfire support while in the Mekong River on August 19, 1965

USS Frank Knox (DD-742) operated on Long Tau River during June 16-17, 1969

USS Southerland (DD-743) operated on Song Nga and Saigon River during July 1966

USS Taussig (DD-746) operated on Soirap River in Mekong River Delta during June 15-26, 1966

USS Samuel N. Moore (DD-747) operated on Saigon River, Rung Sat Special Zone, and Mekong River Delta during November 1965 and September-December 1968

USS John A. Bole (DD-755) operated on Saigon River during July 4-6, 1966

USS Lofberg (DD-759) operated on Song Nha Be River during February 18-21 and April 14-15, 1969 and on Song Cua Dai River during April 10-12, 1969

USS Strong (DD-758) operated in Mekong River Delta and Rung Sat Special Zone during April 1968

USS John W. Thomason (DD-760) operated on Mekong River Delta for Operation Deck House III during August 1966 and on Nga Be River during 1969

USS Buck (DD-761) operated on Mekong River Delta and Saigon River during October 1966

USS Lloyd Thomas (DD-764) operated on Ganh Rai Bay and Saigon River area during December 28, 1970

USS Lowry (DD-770) operated on Mekong River Delta during October 1968 (see other category)

USS De Haven (DD-727) operated on Mekong River September 1, 1963

USS Douglas H. Fox (DD-779) operated on Ganh Rai Bay and Rung Sat Special Zone during March 16-20, 1969

USS Rowan (DD-782) operated on Song Tra Khuc River and Qui Nhon Bay from April through July 1965, December 1967, and June 1969

USS Gurke (DD-783) operated on Ganh Rai Bay, Saigon River, and Mekong River during October 1966 and May 1969

USS McKean (DD-784) operated on Mekong and Saigon River Deltas during
March 14-15, 1967

USS Henderson (DD-785) operated on Saigon River during December 17, 1965

USS Richard B. Anderson (DD-786) operated on Mekong River Delta during May-June, 1966 (see other category)

USS James E. Kyes (DD-787) provided naval gunfire support on Song Ca River during October 1967 and Ganh Rai Bay during June 1969

USS Shelton (DD-790) operated on Saigon River during January 16, 1966

USS Preston (DD-795) operated on Mekong River Delta, Ganh Rai Bay, and Saigon River during September 28 – 29 and December 27 – 29, 1965, on Mekong River Delta June 3, 1967, and Ganh Rai Bay on November 24, 1968

USS Chevalier (DD-805) operated on Saigon River during June 15-21, 1966, and Mekong River Delta during January 25, 1968

USS Higbee (DD-806) provided naval gunfire support from Ganh Rai Bay and Mekong River Delta during January-February and April 1966; March 1969; and September 1970 (see other category)

USS Benner (DD-807) operated on Ganh Rai Bay and Rung Sat Special Zone during June 26-July 1, 1968

USS Dennis J Buckley (DD-808) operated on Mekong River Delta, Saigon River, and Ganh Rai Bay during July 1965 and from December 19, 1966 to January 16, 1967; and on Mekong River Delta during June 1971 (see other category)

USS New (DD-818) operated on Song Bu Lu River during October 1967

USS Holder (DD-819) operated on Vung Ganh Rai and Saigon River during August 5, 1966

USS Samuel B. Roberts (DD-823) operated on Mekong River Delta and Saigon River during December 1965

USS Basilone (DD-824) operated on Saigon River, May 24-25, 1966

USS Agerholm (DD-826) operated on Song Nga River and Ganh Rai Bay during March-April 1969

USS Myles C. Fox (DD-829) entered Qui Nhon Bay during February 1967

USS Everett F. Larson (DD-830) operated on Mekong River during December 1967

USS Hanson (DD-832) operated on Saigon River during July 2-3, 1965 and September 13, 1966 (see other category)

USS Herbert J Thomas (DD-833) operated in Mekong River Delta during December 1966 and on Saigon River during April 28, 1968

USS George K. Mackenzie (DD-836) operated on Ganh Rai Bay during February 1969

USS Glennon (DD-840) provided gunfire support on Cua Viet River during June 7, 1972

USS Noa (DD-841) operated on Qui Nhon Bay during April 1969

USS Fiske (DD-842) operated on Mekong River, June 16-21, 1966

USS Warrington (DD-843) operated on Mekong River Delta and Rung Sat Special Zone during March 1967

USS Ozbourn (DD-846) conducted fire support missions on Saigon River October-November 1965 and August-October 1966

USS Robert L. Wilson (DD-847) entered Song Da Rang River (near Tuy Hoi) and Rung Sat Special Zone area during February-March 1969

USS Richard E. Kraus (DD-849) operated on inland river north of Da Nang during June 2-5, 1966, protecting Marines holding a bridge

USS Rupertus (DD-851) operated on Saigon River during April 1966 and May 1969

USS Leonard F. Mason (DD-852) operated on Ganh Rai Bay and channels during August 1969

USS Fred T. Berry (DD-858) operated in Mekong River Delta area on March 15, 1966

USS Norris (DD-859) conducted operations on inland Song Nga River during November-December 1966

USS McCaffery (DD-860) provided naval gunfire support while in Mekong River during April 8-9, 1967

USS Vogelgesang (DD-862 ) provided gunfire support while in Thu Bong River during October 18-29, 1966 (see other category)

USS Harold J. Ellison (DD-864) operated on Saigon River between late 1965 and mid 1966

USS Brownson (DD-868) operated on Song Nha Be River and Mekong River Delta during February 1967

USS Fechteler (DD-870) operated in Mekong River Delta on September 27, 1965 and Qui Nhon Bay November 25-26, 1968 (see other category)

USS Damato (DD-871) operated on Saigon River during December 12-13, 1967

USS Forrest Royal (DD-872) operated on Saigon River during June 1967

USS Duncan (DD-874) operated on Long Tau River and Rung Sat Special Zone during January 1969 and Qui Nhon Bay during March 1969 (see other category)

USS Henry W. Tucker (DD-875) operated on Qui Nhon Bay during 1965 and August 1968 and Mekong River Delta during March 1966 and May1969 (see other categories)

USS Perkins (DD-877) operated on Ganh Rai Bay during October 1967 and on Saigon River during June 1969

USS Vesole (DD-878) operated on Saigon River during December 1965-February 1966

USS Leary (DD-879) operated on the Mekong River Delta on October 9, 1967

USS Dyess (DD-880) operated on Saigon River and Rung Sat Special Zone from June 19–July 1, 1966

USS Newman K. Perry (DD-883) operated on Mekong River Delta and Saigon River
November 23-28, 1966

USS Floyd B. Parks (DD-884) operated on Saigon River and Ganh Rai Bay during February and March 1968

USS John R. Craig (DD-885) operated on inland waterway during July 1965 (see other category)

USS Orleck (DD-886) operated on Mekong River Delta during July 1969

USS Brinkley Bass (DD-887) conducted fire support mission on Saigon River during November 11-17, 1968, and in Rung Sat Special Zone during February 9-11, 1970 (see other category)

USS Barry (DD-933) operated on Saigon River during December 1965

USS Du Pont (DD-941) operated on Mekong River Delta during October 1968

USS Mullinnix (DD-944) operated on Vung Ganh Rai and Saigon River during August 5-6, 1966

USS Morton (DD-948) operated on Vung Ganh Rai and Saigon River during April
1966 and February 1969 (see other category)

USS Richard S Edwards (DD-950) operated on Mekong River Delta in Province of Kien Hoa during February 28 and March 1, 1969 (see other category)

USS Turner Joy (DD-951) entered Cua Viet River channel on December 24, 1969

USS Henry B. Wilson (DDG-7) [Guided Missile Destroyer] operated on Mekong River Delta during May 1968 (see other category)

USS Lynde McCormick (DDG-8) operated on Cua Ham Loung River and Mekong River Delta during April 1966 and Mekong River Delta during March 1969

USS Towers (DDG-9) operated on Saigon River and Rung Sat Special Zone during July 1966

USS Robison (DDG-12) provided naval gunfire support for Operation Jackstay in Rung Sat Special Zone and Saigon River during April 1966

USS Joseph Strauss (DDG-16) operated on Mekong River Delta March 4, 1966 and Ganh Rai Bay during November 7 and December 7, 1968

USS Goldsborough (DDG-20) operated on Cua Dai River December 13, 1968 (see other category)

USS Benjamin Stoddert (DDG-22) operated on the Song Lang Nuog River December 24, 1965 and the Cua Viet River April 25, 1972 (see other category)
USS Waddell (DDG-24) operated on Saigon River during March 1966 and Cua Viet River during March 1967

USS Duncan (DDR-874) [Radar Picket Destroyer] operated on Saigon River during September and October 1965

USS Falgout (DER-324) [Radar Pickett Ship] operated on Mekong River during June 1965 and entered Qui Nhon Bay as part of operation with PCFs interdicting junk traffic during May 1966

USS Lowe (DE-325) anchored in Saigon Harbor during April 1966

USS Walton (DE-361) travelled up Saigon River and docked in Saigon Harbor during March 1962

USS Alvin C. Cockrell (DE-366) anchored in Saigon Harbor for four days during May 1962

USS McMorris (DE-1036) entered Qui Nhon Bay during July 1965

USS Davidson (DE-1045) operated on Vung Ganh Rai and Rung Sat Special Zone of Mekong River Delta from September 16 to October 5, 1967 (see other category)

USS Finch (DER-328) [Destroyer Escort Radar] entered Qui Nhon Bay on January 20, 1966 and December 1967 (when crewmembers painted a Vietnamese orphanage)

USS Kretchmer (DER-329) entered Qui Nhon Bay during September and November 1965, June and August 1966, and April 1967

USS Vance (DER-387) entered Qui Nhon Bay on January 20, 1966

USS Mahan (DLG-11) [Guided Missile Frigate] visited Saigon via Saigon River October
24-28, 1962

USS Vancouver (LPD-2) [Amphibious Transport Dock] entered Qui Nhon Bay during September 11-12, 1971 (see other category)

USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2) [Landing Platform, Helicopter] entered Qui Nhon Bay in July 1965 (see other category)

USS Princeton (LPH-5) operated on Ganh Rai Bay during April 1966 (see other category)

USS Valley Forge (LPH-8) entered mouth of Hue River during December 1965 (see other category)

USS Carter Hall (LSD-3) [Landing Ship Dock] delivered supplies up Saigon River to Nha Be during March-May 1967 and June 1968 (see other category)

USS Gunston Hall (LSD-5) operated on Saigon River during April 1965 and March 1968 (see other category)

USS Oak Hill (LSD-7) conducted salvage operations for damaged swift boat on Ganh Hao River during July 1967 (see other category)

USS Cabildo (LSD-16) delivered equipment to Nha Be via the Long Tau River during June 1968

USS Catamount (LSD-17) travelled up Saigon River to Saigon during November 1962 and operated on Nha Be and Long Tau Rivers during April 1969 (see other category)

USS Colonial (LSD-18) travelled up Saigon River to Nha Be during April 1966 and June and September 1969 (see other category)

USS Fort Marion (LSD-22) navigated Saigon River to dock in Saigon during February 1966 (see other category)

USS Whetstone (LSD-27) anchored as long term “boat haven” for repairs of smaller vessels on Qui Nhon Bay during June-July 1965 (see other category)

USS Thomaston (LSD-28) conducted dredge lift on Saigon River during November 1964

USS Point Defiance (LSD-31) entered Qui Nhon Bay to deliver troops during July 1965; operated on Saigon River during March 1967; and conducted several operations on Saigon River to Saigon Port during October and November 1968 (see other category)

USS Alamo (LSD-33) landed Marines while at Qui Nhon Bay during July 1965 and at Rung Sat Special Zone during March-April 1966 (see other category)

USS Anchorage (LSD-36) transported troops and supplies into Qui Nhon Bay during June 1970 and January 1972 (see other category)

USS Catskill (MCS/MSC-1) [Minesweeper-Coastal] entered Saigon River on March 18, 1970

USS Woodpecker (MSC-209) entered Qui Nhon Bay during May 1965

USS Gannet (MSC-290) operated on rivers of Mekong Delta at Vinh Long and Binh Thuy during May 1967

USS Whippoorwill (MSC-207) [Minesweeper-Ocean] entered Qui Nhon Bay repeatedly during July-August 1968 (see other category)

USS Conflict (MSO-426) [Minesweeper-Ocean] operated on Saigon River April 1, 1966 and Song Huong River (Perfume River) May 14, 1966 (see other category)

USS Enhance (MSO-437) entered Qui Nhon Bay repeatedly during October through November 1968 and January through February 1969

USS Esteem (MSO-438) crewmembers painted a Vietnamese orphanage while docked at Qui Nhon Bay during December 1967 and again during March 1969

USS Fortify (MSO-446) travelled up the Saigon River to Saigon September 19-22, 1964

USS Illusive (MSO-448) conducted training with Vietnamese Navy on Saigon River from January through March 1962

USS Inflict (MSO-456) travelled up the Saigon River to Saigon September 19-22, 1964

USS Loyalty (MSO-457) travelled up the Saigon River to Saigon September 19-22, 1964 (see other category)

USS Conquest (MSO-488) operated on Saigon River during 1962 and entered Qui Nhon Bay on January 29 and February 7-9, 1969

USS Pledge (MSO-492) entered Qui Nhon Bay on May 8, 15, and 21, 1971 (see other category)

USS W. A. Mann (T-AP-112) [Military Transport] entered Qui Nhon Bay August 23, 1965

USS Breckinridge (T-AP-176) entered Qui Nhon Bay September 16-17, 1965

USS Geiger (T-AP-197) entered Qui Nhon Bay November 23-26, 1965

USNS General Hugh J. Gaffey (T-AP-121) entered Qui Nhon Bay November 6-8, 1966

USS Eaton (DD-510) entered the mouth of the Saigon River in the Mekong River Delta on August 23, 1967

USS William C. Lawe (DD-763) – Operated on the mouth of the Cua Viet River on December 20, 1972

USS Sample (DE-1048) – Travelled on Cua Viet River on April 27, 1972

USS Corry (DD-817) – provided Naval gunfire support on the Mekong River on October 27, 1968 (see other category)

III. Ships that docked to shore or pier in Vietnam

Da Nang Harbor

USS Samuel Gompers (AD-37) [Destroyer Tender] multiple dockings to piers at
Da Nang during April 1972

USS Graffias (AF-29) [Auxiliary Stores Ship] docked to pier at Da Nang for resupply on February 20 and November 25, 1967, and conducted other in-port docking replenishments at An Thoi and Vung Tau during 1967

USS Pictor (AF-54) docked to pier at Da Nang during 1969 (see other category)

USS Aludra (AF-55), conducted in-port docking replenishments at Cam Ranh Bay, Vung Tau, An Thoi, and Da Nang during March-April 1969

USS Regulus (AF-57) conducted numerous in-port docking replenishments at Cam Ranh Bay, Vung Tau, An Thoi, and Da Nang during March-November 1966, May-July 1967, February-December 1968, October-December 1969, June-September 1970, and April-July 1971

USS Procyon (AF-61) docked and conducted in-port replenishments at Da Nang during June 1965, November 1965, January 1966, December 1966, August 1967, and April 1970; and at Cam Ranh Bay during January 1966 and May 1970

USS Castor (AKS-1) [General Stores Ship] docked to pier at Da Nang on October 7,
1966

USS Caliente (AO-53) [Fleet Oiler] docked for in-port replenishment at An Thoi and
Vung Tau during June 1970

USS Manatee (AO-58) docked for in-port replenishment at An Thoi and
Vung Tau during November 1968

USS Passumpsic (A0-107) docked in-port at An Thoi on June 28, 1971

USS Grapple (ARS-7) [Salvage Ship] conducted numerous repair and salvaging operations while moored to beach or piers at Da Nang, Chu Lai, Cam Ranh Bay, and Tan My during January 1967; November 1970 through April 1971; and August 1972 through January 1973

USS Deliver (ARS-23) docked in Cam Ranh Bay to pick up DeLong floating pier July 26-28, 1973

USS Safeguard (ARS-25) docked at Pier-2 in Cam Ranh Bay on August 14, 1971 (see other category)

USS Mataco (ATF-86) [Fleet Ocean Tug] docked to piers at Da Nang during May and August 1968 (see other category)

USS Arikara (ATF-98) docked to piers at Da Nang from September to December 1969 (see other category)

USS Kula Gulf (CVE-108) [Small Aircraft Carrier: used as helicopter and troop transport] docked at Cam Ranh Bay November 13-16, 1965

USS Braine (DD-630) docked to pier at Da Nang on November 27, 1966

USS Charles S. Sperry (DD-697) docked at Da Nang during January 1966 (see other category)

USS Wiltsie (DD-716) docked in Da Nang during January 1973, with evidence of crew members going ashore (see other category)

USS Hamner (DD-718) docked to pier with destroyer tender at Da Nang during April 11-12, 1972

USS Epperson (DD-719) docked to Da Nang Pier on October 4, 1970 (see other category)

USS James C. Owens (DD-776) docked at Cam Ranh Bay on April 30, 1968

USS Richard B Anderson (DD-786) docked to pier at Da Nang on August 29, 1972 (see other category)

USS Dennis J Buckley (DD-808) docked to pier in Da Nang Harbor to deliver drone on December 15, 1969 (see other category)

USS Rich (DD-820) docked to pier at Da Nang on December 13, 1972

USS Ozbourn (DD-846) docked briefly to piers in Da Nang Harbor on February 21, April 1, and April 11, 1971

USS Leonard F. Mason (DD-852) docked to pier at Da Nang on February 12, 1973

USS Cone (DD-866) docked to pier in Da Nang Harbor on December 11, 1972

USS Henry W. Tucker (DD-875) docked to pier in Da Nang Harbor on September 12, 1971 (see other categories)

USS Brinkley Bass (DD-887) sent crew ashore for work details and liberty leave while anchored at Da Nang, Cam Ranh Bay, and Vung Tau during April-May, 1970 (see other category)

USS Manley (DD-940) docked periodically at Da Nang and sent crew members ashore for liberty leave and work details between November 1966 and March 1967

USS Bigelow (DD-942) docked to pier at Da Nang on April 19, 1967

USS Edson (DD-946) docked to Da Nang pier and sent small boats ashore while anchored in Da Nang Harbor and off Point Allison during July 1971

USS Morton (DD-948) docked to pier at Da Nang on February 7-10, 1973 (see other category)

USS Henry B. Wilson (DDG-7) [Guided Missile Destroyer] docked at Da Nang pier on April 2, 1967 and September 29, 1971 (see other category)

USS Buchanan (DDG-14) docked to pier with destroyer tender at Da Nang during April 11-12, 1972

USS Bronstein (DE-1037) [Destroyer Escort] docked to pier at Da Nang on December 11, 1972

USS Lang (DE-1060) docked to pier #4 in Da Nang Harbor for 38 minutes on January 5, 1972, and sent whaleboat to and from shore with “briefing personnel” on January 8, 1973

USS Ramsey (DEG-2) [Destroyer Escort] docked to pier in Da Nang Harbor on November 24th and 30th, 1969, and January 6, 1973

USS Newell (DER-322) [Destroyer Escort Radar] docked at port of Nha Trang during December 22-24, 1965

USS Gridley (DLG-21) [Guided Missile Frigate] Docked to Pier #2 in Da Nang Harbor to unload a damaged helicopter on January 12, 1967

USS Durham (LKA-114) [Amphibious Cargo Ship] docked to piers at Da Nang during March 20-21, July 20-21, August 18-19, and September 7, 1970

USS Mobile (LKA-115) docked to pier at Da Nang on September 20, 1970 and April 16, 1971 (see other category)

USS Ogden (LPD-5) [Amphibious Transport Dock] made numerous dockings at Da Nang to transport troops and supplies, with crew members going ashore, from February 1966 to March 1973

USS Duluth (LPD-6) made numerous dockings at Da Nang, as well as transporting troops and supplies to Chu Lai, Vung Tau, and Quang Tri, from May 1967 to August 1972; also participated in evacuation of Saigon during April 1975 by sending rescue boats ashore at Vung Tau

USS Dubuque (LPD-8) docked at Da Nang on March 15, 1970

USS Vancouver (LPD-9) docked to pier at Da Nang on June 19, 1971 (see other category)

USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2) [Landing Platform, Helicopter] docked to pier at Da Nang on October 6, 1969 and May 19-20, 1971 (see other category)

USS Okinawa (LPH-3) docked to pier at Cam Ranh Bay to offload aircraft during May 1971

USS Boxer (LPH-4) docked to pier at Cam Ranh Bay on September 9, 1965

USS New Orleans (LPH-11) docked to pier at Da Nang on March 12, 1970

USS Hermitage (LSD-34) [Landing Ship Dock] docked to Da Nang pier June 2-3, 1967 (see other category)

USS Warbler (MSC-206) [Minesweeper-Coastal] docked to pier at Cam Ranh Bay July 22-25, 1964 and June 18 and July 6, 1970

USS Widgeon (MSC-208) docked repeatedly to piers at Cam Ranh Bay during July 1964 and June-July 1969

USS Whippoorwill (MSC-207) docked to pier at Cam Ranh Bay during July 22-25, 1964; March 10, 1969; July 21 and 29, August 13, and September 1, 1970 (see other category)

USS Conflict (MSO-426) [Minesweeper-Ocean] docked to piers at Cam Ranh Bay on September 30, October 7, 27, 28, and 31, 1971 (see other category)

USS Endurance (MSO-435) docked to piers at Da Nang at various times during March-June, 1969

USS Excel (MSO-439) docked to pier at Cam Ranh Bay July 31, 1967

USS Firm (MSO-444) docked to pier at Da Nang November 26-30, 1969 and docked to piers at Cam Ranh Bay February-April, 1971

USS Force (MSO-445) while moored with other ships in Vung Tau Harbor, sent crew ashore for liberty leave March 3-7, 1967; and docked to pier at Cam Ranh Bay March 13-15, 1972 and Vung Tau April 25-May 3, 1972

USS Fortify (MSO-446) docked to pier at Cam Ranh Bay on September 30 and November 29, 1971

USS Guide (MSO-447) docked to pier at Cam Ranh Bay on September 30, 1971 (see other category)

USS Loyalty (MSO-457) docked to pier at Cam Ranh Bay on April 9 and 25, 1971 (see other category)

USS Lucid (MSO-458) docked to pier at Da Nang for off-loading and on-loading equipment during May 1967

USS Prime (MSO-466) docked to pier at Da Nang on February 16, 1967

USS Gallant (MSO-489) docked to pier at Da Nang during November 5-6, 1969

USS Leader (MSO-490) docked to pier at Cam Ranh Bay on November 30, 1968

USS Persistent (MSO-491) docked to piers at Da Nang and Cam Ranh Bay during October-December 1970

USS Pledge (MSO-492) docked to pier at Cam Ranh Bay intermittently during July 1967 and May-June 1971 (see other category)

USS Boston (CAG-1) – docked in-port at Da Nang Harbor on April 30th and May 17th, 1967

USS Grasp (ARS-24) – moored to the shore at Wunder Beach and Chu Lai on multiple occasions to repair seaload fuel lines in July and August 1968

USS Albatross (MSC-289) – docked to Junk Training Command Pier, Cam Ranh Bay, on July 22-25, 1964

USS Abnaki (ATF-96) – docked to pier in Da Nang on September 16, 1967

IV. Ships operating on Vietnam’s close coastal waters for extended periods with evidence that crew members went ashore

USS Isle Royale (AD-29) [Destroyer Tender-Repair Ship] salvaged the beached USS Mahnomen County (LST-912) at Chu Lai during January 1967 with crewmembers going ashore for stripping operations

USS Surfbird (ADG-383) [Degaussing Ship] sent crew members ashore during anti-mine degaussing operations at Cam Ranh Bay, Vung Tau, Da Nang, and Con Son Island during September-November 1967; March-July and December 1968; March and December 1969; and January-February 1970 (see other category)

USS Pyro (AE-24) [Auxiliary Explosive, Ammunition Ship] sent small boat ashore from Da Nang Harbor with injured crew member for medical treatment on September 29, 1972

USS Mount McKinley (AGC-7) [Amphibious Force Flagship] Command ship for 7th Fleet Amphibious Force operated out of Da Nang during 1969 with evidence that crew members went ashore (see other category)

USS Eldorado (AGC-11) sent crewmembers ashore for liberty leave at Cam Ranh Bay during June 1967 and July 1970

USS Estes (AGC-12) sent crewmembers ashore for beach picnic at Vung Tau during April 1968 (see other category)

USS Oxford (AGTR-1) [Technical Research Ship] conducted numerous month-long deployments along the Vietnam coast collecting data, with evidence that crewmembers went ashore, between 1965 and 1969

USS Jamestown (AGTR-3) conducted numerous month-long deployments along the Vietnam coast collecting data, with photographic evidence that crewmembers went ashore, between January 1966 and September 1969

USS Repose (AH-16) [Hospital Ship] operated continuously on close coastal waters from 1966-1970, with evidence that crewmembers went ashore on liberty leave

USS Sanctuary (AH-17) operated continuously on close coastal waters from 1967-1971, with evidence that crewmembers went ashore on liberty leave

USS Ponchatoula (AO-148) [Fleet Oiler] sent crew members ashore to visit the An Thoi Naval Base on April 27, 1969

USS Tolovana (AO-64) sent crew ashore for beach party at Phu Quoc during May 1971

USS Sacramento (AOE-1) [Fast Combat Support Ship] regularly sent helicopters ashore to Da Nang for mail pick-up during March-August 1970

USS Calvert (APA-32) [Amphibious Attack Transport] served as Da Nang Harbor station ship, with crewmembers going ashore, from November 1965 through January 1966 (see other category)

USS Cavalier (APA-37) served as Da Nang Harbor station ship, with crewmembers going ashore, from June-July 1966 (see other category)

USS Cook (APD-130) [High Speed Transport] conducted tactical beach surveys with crew members ashore along Vietnam coast during June and July 1966

USS Ajax (AR-6) [Repair Ship] anchored in Vung Tau area for repair duties with evidence of shore-based repairs during June 1968, September to October 1969, April to May 1970, and August to November 1971

USS Hector (AR-7) anchored in Vung Tau Harbor repairing other vessels from July 20 to August 16, 1970, with deck logs stating that crewmembers went ashore on liberty leave

USS Jason (AR-8) anchored in Vung Tau Harbor repairing other vessels with deck logs showing evidence of crewmembers going ashore June through August 1968, December 1969 through January 1970, and March through April 1971

USS Safeguard (ARS-25) [Salvage Ship] anchored in Da Nang Harbor repairing other vessels with evidence that workboats went ashore during July 1971 (see other category)

USS Delta (AR-9) anchored in Vung Tau Harbor repairing other vessels during July 1969 with deck logs showing that crewmembers went ashore on liberty leave

USS Klondike (AR-22) anchored in Vung Tau Harbor repairing other vessels during April 1969 with deck logs showing that crewmembers went ashore

USNS Corpus Christi Bay (T-ARVH-1) [Helicopter Repair Ship] anchored in Cam Ranh Bay from 1966 to 1969 with US Army crew of helicopter repair technicians who went ashore regularly and assisted a Vietnamese orphanage

USS Ute (ATF-76) [Fleet Ocean Tug] conducted numerous salvaging operations on beached vessels from April 1966 through April 1971 with crewmembers going ashore and all attended beach party at Cam Ranh Bay on April 12, 1969

USS Currituck (AV-7) [Sea Plane Tender] anchored at Cam Ranh Bay for month long periods during 1966 and 1967 to repair and tend to Navy sea planes, with evidence that crewmembers went ashore on liberty leave (see other category)

USS Pine Island (AV-12) anchored at Da Nang during August 1964, and Cam Ranh Bay for month long periods during 1965 and 1966, to repair and tend to Navy sea planes, with evidence that crewmembers went ashore on liberty leave

USS Salisbury Sound (AV-13) anchored at Da Nang during February 1965, Con Son Island during May 1965, and Cam Ranh Bay for month long periods during 1966, to repair and tend to Navy sea planes, with evidence that crewmembers went ashore

USS New Jersey (BB-62) sent 30 crew members ashore for Thanksgiving dinner while offshore near Hue on November 28, 1968

USS Saint Paul (CA-73) [Cruiser] while anchored in Da Nang Harbor, small boats sent ashore on May 9, 1969, and May 25, July 17, and September 17, 1970

USS Canberra (CAG-2) [Guided Missile Cruiser] sent small boats and helicopters ashore while anchored in Da Nang Harbor during April 1965 (see other category)

USS Chicago (CG-11) [Guided Missile Cruiser] while anchored in Da Nang Harbor on May 22, 1969, deck logs show a utility boat went ashore for one hour with 8 crewmembers aboard

USS Long Beach (CGN-9) [Guided Missile Cruiser, Nuclear] while anchored in Da Nang Harbor, deck logs show that utility boats went ashore with passengers on May 5, 1968 and the Captains Gig went ashore on September 4, 1969

USS Oklahoma City (CLG-5) [Light Guided Missile Cruiser] sent small boats ashore while anchored in Da Nang Harbor during September 1966 and January-February 1970 and sent ship’s softball team ashore during July 1969 (see other category)

USS Porterfield (DD-682 [Destroyer] while operating in close coastal waters on March 19, 1966, two officers and a seaman went ashore in a junk and, on April 8, 1966, a small boat went ashore from Da Nang Harbor with Vietnamese officers

USS Wiltsie (DD-716) while operating in close coastal waters during September 1970, two officers and five sailors were sent ashore by helicopter for one night (see other category)

USS Epperson (DD-719) while anchored off Phan Thiet on November 16, 1969, crewmembers went ashore for liberty leave (see other category)

USS O’Brien (DD-725) sent motorized whaleboat ashore while anchored in Da Nang Harbor on December 16, 1969

USS Maddox (DD-731) sent motorized whaleboats ashore while anchored in Vung Tau Harbor on March 3, 1967

USS Blue (DD-744) anchored in Da Nang Harbor on April 21, 1968, with crewmembers going ashore for picnic

USS Lowry (DD-770) sent motorized whaleboat ashore at Phan Thiet on June 5, 1968 (see other category)

USS Stormes (DD-780) sent motorized whaleboat ashore to assist 2nd ARVN and 2nd US Advisory Group on September 17, 1966

USS Eversole (DD-789) sent motorized whaleboat ashore to Chu Lai from offshore anchorage to transfer two crewmembers on July 25, 1972

USS Shelton (DD-790) conducted small boat inland waterborne logistics craft (WBLC) surveillance of Cua Viet River on August 16, 1972

USS Higbee (DD-806) sent small boats ashore while anchored in Da Nang Harbor on September 9, 1965 and December 7, 1967 (see other category)

USS Corry (DD-817) sent small boats ashore while anchored in Da Nang Harbor January 11-12, 1969 and Nha Trang Harbor February 20, 1969

USS New (DD-818) sent whaleboat ashore from Da Nang Harbor for mission briefing on August 8, 1967

USS Carpenter (DD-825) sent medical team ashore at Song Tra Village on December 20, 1968

USS Everett F. Larson (DD-830) sent crew members ashore for beach party while anchored in Van Phong Bay on September 15, 1969

USS Hanson (DD-832) sent motorized whaleboats ashore from Da Nang Harbor on September 17, 1972, for medical evacuation and mail pickup (see other category)

USS Power (DD-839) sent Commanding Officer and others ashore in whaleboat for briefing while anchored in Da Nang Harbor on November 13, 1968

USS Bausell (DD-845) sent small boat ashore for briefing while in Da Nang Harbor on November 27, 1968

USS Richard E. Krause (DD-849) sent motorized whaleboats ashore while in Da Nang Harbor on December 29, 1972

USS Rupertus (DD-851) sent motorized whaleboats ashore while in Da Nang Harbor on January 4, 1973

USS McCaffery (DD-860) sent small boat ashore while in Da Nang Harbor December 12-14, 1972

USS Vogelgesang (DD-862) anchored in Da Nang Harbor and sent 30 crewmembers ashore on August 15, 1966 (see other category)

USS Steinaker (DD-863) anchored off Phan Thiet July 25- August 3, 1968 with crewmembers going ashore to visit Junk Base

USS Arnold J. Isbell (DD-869) sent small boat ashore while anchored in Da Nang Harbor on April 12, 1970

USS John R. Craig (DD-885) anchored off Nha Trang during summer 1968 with crewmembers going ashore for beach party (see other category)

USS Fechteler (DD-870) sent crew ashore for beach party on September 25, 1965, and while conducting night patrols of Da Nang Harbor, crewmembers went ashore for daytime liberty leave during October 1965 (see other category)

USS Duncan (DD-874) sent small boat ashore for briefing while anchored in Da Nang Harbor on December 14, 1968 (see other category)

USS Henry W. Tucker (DD-875) sent whaleboat ashore at Da Nang for briefing on January 23, 1969; sent medical team ashore while off Quang Ngai on 27 February, 1969; conducted whaleboat transfers of personnel to shore on August 27, 1972; sent small boat ashore to transport body for transfer to An Thoi on November 14, 1972; ship’s helicopter transported personnel ashore on November 22, 1972 (see other categories)

USS Rogers (DD-876) sent whaleboats ashore while anchored in Da Nang Harbor July 29-August 3, 1971

USS Davis (DD-937) sent small boats ashore from anchorage while providing gunfire support in Da Nang Harbor during December 1968

USS Hull (DD-945) sent small boats ashore while anchored off Nha Trang on February 17, 1968

USS Morton (DD-948) sent small boat ashore at Hue on November 13, 1972 (see other category)

USS Barney (DDG-6) [Guided Missile Destroyer] while serving as Flagship for Destroyer Division One Six Two, sent crew members ashore at Da Nang for gunfire mission planning during June-July 1967

USS Berkeley (DDG-15) sent small boats ashore at Da Nang and elsewhere for gunfire support missions during May-June 1970

USS Goldsborough (DDG-20) sent small boats ashore from Da Nang Harbor on December 20 and 24, 1972 (see other category)

USS Benjamin Stoddert (DDG-22) sent small boats ashore from Da Nang Harbor on September 17, 1969 and December 22, 1970 (see other category)

USS Ernest G. Small (DDR-838) [Radar Picket Destroyer] repeatedly sent small boats ashore with naval gunfire spotters in II Corps area during April-May 1966

USS McGinty (DE-365) [Destroyer Escort] sent crew members ashore at Da Nang for a party on WESTPAC cruise during spring 1962

USS Charles E. Brannon (DE-446) sent crew members ashore for liberty leave at Duong Dong during March 1962

USS Davidson (DE-1045) sent motorized whaleboat ashore while anchored off coast of Tan My on September 20, 1972 (see other category)

USS O’Callahan (DE-1051) sent gunfire spotters ashore in vicinity of Cua Viet River on January 13, 1973

USS Gray (DE-1054) sent motorized whaleboat ashore from Da Nang Harbor for mail pickup on October 7, 1972

USS Ouellet (DE-1077) sent motorized whaleboat ashore from Da Nang Harbor on July 29, 1972

USS Koiner (DER-331) [Destroyer Escort, Radar] crew had liberty leave at Vung Tau and survey parties were sent ashore at various locations while on Operation Market Time radar patrol during 1967

USS Forester (DER-334) crew had liberty leave at Nha Trang on June 28 and July 10 1965, with whale boat ashore for medical assistance on August 20, 1965

USS Wilhoite (DER-397) sent crew members onto enemy vessel in De Sey Ky River during July 16, 1965 and sent landing party ashore from Vung Tau Harbor on September 28, 1968

USS Hissem (DER-400) moored to port side of USS Tuluita (ARG-4) for repairs in Vung Tau area from January 11-23, 1967, with evidence that crewmembers went ashore for liberty leave and sent motorized whaleboat ashore for briefing at An Thoi on February 3, 1967

USS King (DLG-10) sent whaleboat ashore from Da Nang Harbor for operations briefing on April 13, 1969 and August 8, 1970

USS Mahan (DLG-11) [Guided Missile Frigate] sent a “group of personnel” ashore at Da Nang for a short tour of Monkey Mountain on October 6, 1968 (see other category)

USS Dahlgren (DLG-12) sent motorized whaleboat and Captain’s gig ashore while anchored in Da Nang Harbor on June 4, 1967

USS William V. Pratt (DLG-13) sent whaleboat ashore from Da Nang Harbor for mission briefing on August 8, 1967

USS Dewey (DLG-14) sent whaleboat ashore for briefing while in Da Nang Harbor on January 15, 1968

USS Worden (DLG-18) sent whaleboat ashore for briefing while in Da Nang Harbor on November 27, 1968

USS Richmond K. Turner (DLG-20) sent whaleboat ashore from Da Nang Harbor for mission briefing on December 4, 1966

USS England (DLG-22) sent whaleboat ashore from Da Nang Harbor for mission briefings on March 9, 1967 and July 30, 1968

USS Belknap (DLG-26) while in Da Nang Harbor on December 1, 1969, received crew members back to ship from temporary duty ashore

USS Jouett (DLG-29) sent whaleboat ashore from Da Nang Harbor for mission briefings on February 15, April 15, and June 1, 1968

USS Fox (DLG-33) sent small boat ashore from Da Nang Harbor with Captain for mission briefings on October 24, 1967

USS Biddle (DLG-34) sent whaleboat ashore from Da Nang Harbor for briefings on March 5 and June 2, 1968 and delivered North Vietnamese fisherman ashore at Da Nang on July 30, 1969

USS Truxtun (DLGN-35) sent small boats ashore from Da Nang Harbor on June 2, 1968 and October 25, 1969

USS Cleveland (LPD-7) [Amphibious Transport Dock] sent Naval Academy Midshipmen on training mission ashore at Da Nang on 9-10 July, 1970 (see other category)

USS Tripoli (LPH-10) [Landing Platform Helicopter] sent crew members ashore for beach party at Da Nang on July 29, 1967 (see other category)

USS Carter Hall (LSD-3) [Landing Ship Dock] served four-month duty as “boat repair ship” in Da Nang Harbor during 1965, with evidence of crew members going ashore (see other category)

USS Oak Hill (LSD-7) served as station and repair ship in Da Nang Harbor with evidence of crewmembers going ashore from January through March 1966 (see other category)

USS Whetstone (LSD-27) anchored as long term “boat haven” in Da Nang Harbor for repairs of smaller vessels, with evidence of crewmembers going ashore, during April-May 1965 (see other category)

USS Alamo (LSD-33) while anchored in Da Nang Harbor, sent crewmembers ashore for R&R beach parties during March-April 1969 (see other category)

USS Epping Forest (MCS-7) [Mine Countermeasure Support Ship] conducted “goodwill” tours at Cam Ranh Bay and Nha Trang with crewmembers going ashore and Vietnamese coming aboard during September-October 1964, and mine sweep of Cua Viet River using smaller vessels from main ship during May 1968

USS Guide (MSO-447) [Minesweeper-Ocean] sent motorized whaleboats ashore for briefings while in Da Nang Harbor during May 1970 (see other category)

USS Queenfish (SS-393) sent crew ashore for liberty leave while anchored in Nha Trang Harbor from August 27-September 7, 1962

USS Camden (AOE-2) sent a helicopter to Da Nang on October 6, 1970

USS Haleakala (AE-25) anchored in Da Nang Harbor August 27 – 29, 1969, due to boiler accident and sent crew ashore prior to departure for Subic Bay for repairs

USS Savage (DER-386) Sent crew ashore to provide medical assistance to villages from January 1 to 15, 1966, and from June 12 to September 15, 1966

USS Lawrence (DDG-4) Sent a motorized whaleboat ashore on December 8, 1972, to pick up mail and passengers

USS Albert David (DE-1050) Sent a motorized whaleboat ashore while anchored in Da Nang Harbor on December 30, 1969

USS Waddell (DDG-24) Launched a whaleboat and Captain’s GIG to shore while anchored in Da Nang Harbor on December 28, 1971

USS Sample (DE-1048) – sent motor whaleboat to shore on July 26, 1972

USS Blandy (DD-943) – sent motor whaleboat to shore on January 25, 1973
USS Richard S. Edwards (DD-950) – sent personnel ashore via small boat on November 5, 1967, and December 1, 1967 (see other category)

USS Brush (DD-745) – sent whaleboat ashore on January 11, 1969, while anchored in Cam Ranh Bay and on January 12, 1969, while anchored in Vung Tau Harbor

USS Diachenko (APD-123) – conducted tactical beach surveys with crew members from April to August 1968; also, on May 21, 1968, while anchored in Qui Nhon Harbor, a harbor patrol craft arrived at the ship and departed with the commanding officer, operations officer, and communications officer for briefings in Qui Nhon.

USS Henry B. Wilson (DDG-7) – anchored in Da Nang Harbor on July 21, 1965, and sent crew members ashore for liberty following Change-of-Command ceremony.

V. Ships operating on Vietnam’s close coastal waters for extended periods with evidence that smaller craft from the ship regularly delivered supplies or troops ashore

USS Zelima (AF-49) [Auxiliary Stores Ship] conducted numerous in port supply replenishments at Da Nang, Cam Ranh Bay, Vung Tau, and An Thoi from July-October 1965, January-August 1966, October-December 1968, and May-June 1969

USS Vega (AF-59) conducted numerous in port supply replenishments with docking and crew going ashore at Da Nang, Cam Ranh Bay, Vung Tau, and An Thoi during March-April 1966, July-August 1968, June-July 1969, November-December 1970, and April-September 1972 (see other category)

USS Mars (AFS-1) [Combat Stores Ship] conducted numerous on shore supply replenishments at Da Nang, Cam Ranh Bay, Vung Tau, and An Thoi from May 1965 to November 1972 with evidence of crewmembers going ashore

USS Niagara Falls (AFS-3) conducted on shore supply replenishments with helicopters and small boats at Da Nang, Cam Ranh Bay, Vung Tau, and An Thoi from April 1968 to March 1973

USS White Plains (AFS-4) conducted on shore supply replenishments with helicopters and small boats at Da Nang, Cam Ranh Bay, Vung Tau, and An Thoi from January 1969 to March 1973

USS San Jose (AFS-7) conducted on shore supply replenishments with helicopters and small boats at Da Nang, Cam Ranh Bay, and Vung Tau from October 1971 to February 1972 and September 1972 to March 1973

USS Mount McKinley (AGC-7) [Amphibious Force Flagship] conducted troop and supply beach landings at Da Nang and elsewhere during March-May 1965, June-July 1966, and July-November 1967 (see other category)

USS Estes (AGC-12) conducted troop and supply beach landings at Chu Lai and Da Nang during March-October 1965 (see other category)

USS Winston (AKA-94) [Attack Cargo Ship] conducted troop and supply beach landings during July 1965; April-August 1966; September-October 1967; and November 1968-May 1969

USS Mathews (AKA-96) on-loaded supplies at Da Nang and delivered them up the Cua Viet River to Dong Ha with “mike boats” from August through December 1967

USS Merrick (AKA-97) conducted troop and cargo beach landing with small boats at Hue, Chu Lai, and Da Nang from July 1965 through November 1968 (see other category)

USS Seminole (AKA/LKA-104) [Attack/Amphibious Cargo Ship] sent smaller amphibious assault craft ashore for troop landings in November 1965 in support of Operations BLUE MARLIN I and II; conducted troop landings with small boats at Da Nang, Hoi An, and Quang Tri from March through August 1967, September 1968 through February 1969, and during January 1970 (see other category)

USS Skagit (AKA/LKA-105) conducted troop and cargo beach “mike boat” landings at Da Nang, Chu Lai, and Quang Ngai from November 1965 to November 1967

USS Union (AKA/LKA-106) conducted numerous troop and cargo “mike boat” beach landings at Da Nang, Cam Ranh Bay, and Chu Lai from March 1965 to November 1969 (see other category)

USS Washburn (AKA/LKA-108) conducted numerous small boat beach landings at Da Nang, Thon My Thuy, Hue on Perfume River, and Dong Ha on Cua Viet River from 1965 to 1969

USS Tulare (AKA/LKA-112) conducted troop and cargo “mike boat” beach landings at Da Nang, Chu Lai, Cam Ranh Bay, and Vung Tau from July 1965 to February 1973

USS St. Louis (AKA/LKA-116) conducted troop and cargo landings with small boats at Da Nang, Vung Tau, and Quang Nam Province during August-October 1970; January-March 1971; and April-November 1972 (see other category)

USS Navasota (AO-106) [Fleet Oiler] conducted on-shore and in-port replenishment at Vung Tau, Da Nang, Mai Ong Dai, etc. during September 1965-May 1967; January-July 1968; April-July 1969; June-November 1970; and September 1971-June 1972

USS General R M Blatchford (AP-153) [Transport Ship] landed elements of 1st Infantry Division at Vung Tau by small boats during October 1965

USS George Clymer (APA-27) [Amphibious Attack Transport] conducted troop and supply “mike boat” beach landings during July 1965, and March-July 1966, at Da Nang and Chu Lai (see other category)

USS Bayfield (APA-33) conducted troop on loading and “mike boat” landings at Da Nang, Chu Lai, Baie de My Han, and Cua Viet River from July through October 1965 and February through May 1967

USS Cavalier (APA-37) conducted troop landings with mike boats at Chu Lai and Da Nang during March- August 1966 and January-May 1968 (see other category)

USS Henrico (APA-45) conducted numerous troop landings at Da Nang, Chu Lai, and Hue from March through May 1965 and from August 1966 through March 1967

USS Lenawee (APA-195) conducted troop and supply landings at Da Nang and Chu Lai from April 1965 to December 1966

USS Magoffin (APA-199) conducted troop and supply landings at Da Nang and other Vietnam locations from October 1965 through February 1966 and May through November, 1967 (see other category)

USS Navarro (APA-215) conducted troop on and off loading operations from May 1965 to February 1968 at Da Nang, Chu Lai, and Quang Ngai Province (see other category)

USS Okanogan (APA-220) conducted troop and supply landings at various locations during January-July 1962, September 1963-April 1964, July-October 1965, July 1966, November 1966- March 1967, and June-November 1968 (see other category)

USS Pickaway (APA-222) conducted troop and supply landings at various locations during January 1963, July 1965, March-June 1966, and June-October 1967 (see other category)

USS Renville (APA-227) conducted troop landings at Da Nang during August-September 1964, May-August 1965, and March-October 1966

USS Paul Revere (APA-248) conducted small boat troop landings at Quang Ngai Province, Da Nang, and elsewhere from August 1965-April 1966, June- November 1967, March-August 1969, September 1970-March 1971, and August 1972-February 1973 (see other category)

USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19) [Amphibious Command Ship] participated in amphibious landings of troops during March 1972

USS Mobile (LKA-115) [Amphibious Cargo Ship] transported troops and cargo to/from Da Nang and elsewhere July-September 1970, during April 1971, October-November 1971, and January-July 1972 (see other category)

USS Vancouver (LPD-2) [Amphibious Transport Dock] while anchored offshore, conducted numerous amphibious troop beach landings with smaller “mike boats” in the areas of Da Nang, Cam Ranh Bay, Cua Viet River, and Mekong River Delta from February 1965 to September 1971 (see other category)

USS Cleveland (LPD-7) while anchored offshore, sent “mike boats” up Cua Viet River and Hue River from November 1967 through 1968 and up Saigon River during September 1969 (see other category)

USS Dubuque (LPD-8) transported troops, equipment, and supplies ashore with smaller vessels and docked at Da Nang and elsewhere from June-November 1968, October-December 1969, January-March 1970, and April-July 1971

USS Denver (LPD-9) transported troops, equipment, and supplies ashore with smaller vessels and docked at Da Nang and elsewhere from February-September 1970; March-June and November 1971; and January-August 1972

USS Juneau (LPD-10) picked up troops and equipment with smaller vessels and transported them out of Vietnam from August 1970 to March 1971 and June to November 1972
USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2) [Landing Platform, Helicopter] operated as troop transport with helicopters and smaller vessels transporting troops on and off shore for amphibious assaults from May 1965 to August 1972 (see other category)

USS Okinawa (LPH-3) operated as troop transport with helicopters and smaller vessels transporting troops on and off shore for amphibious assaults, with evidence that crew members went ashore to assist civilians, from April-November 1967, December 1968-May 1969, June- November 1970, and April-November 1972

USS Princeton (LPH-5) operated as troop transport with helicopters and smaller vessels transporting troops on and off shore during April 1962 and from October 1964 to December 1968 (see other category)

USS Valley Forge (LPH-8) operated as troop transport with helicopters and smaller vessels transporting troops on and off shore from September 1964 to September 1969 (see other category)

USS Tripoli (LPH-10) operated as troop transport with helicopters and smaller vessels transporting troops on and off shore intermittently from May 1967 to December 1973 (see other category)

USS Carter Hall (LSD-3) [Landing Ship Dock] while anchored offshore, conducted troop-landing operations with “mike boats” at Da Nang, Dong Ha, and other locations from July 1965 through November 1968 (see other category)

USS Gunston Hall (LSD-5) conducted numerous troop, supply, and equipment landings at Da Nang, Chu Lai, etc. during January-June 1965; May-December 1966; March-July 1968; and September 1969 to February 1970 (see other category)

USS Oak Hill (LSD-7) conducted numerous troop and supply landings with evidence of crew members going ashore at Da Nang, Chu Lai, Vung Tau, and Hue, from October 1965-April 1966, March-August 1967, and September 1968-February 1969 (see other category)

USS Colonial (LSD-18) conducted numerous troop, supply, and equipment landings at Da Nang, Chu Lai, and Vung Tau from March 1966 to September 1969 (see other category)

USS Cabildo (LSD-16) conducted numerous troop, supply, and equipment landings at Da Nang, Cam Ranh Bay, and Vung Tau from July 1965 to November 1968

USS Catamount (LSD-17) conducted numerous troop, supply, and equipment landings at Da Nang, Vung Tau, and Cua Viet River area on piers and with small boats from December 1965 to May 1969 (see other category)

USS Fort Marion (LSD-22) conducted numerous supply landings at Da Nang, Cam Ranh Bay, and Mekong Delta area, with crew members going ashore, from October 1965-June 1966, September-December 1967, and December 1968-May 1969 (see other category)

USS Whetstone (LSD-27) conducted numerous troop and supply landings with smaller mike boats at Da Nang, Hue, Phu Bai, and Dong Ha from March 1965 to September 1969 (see other category)

USS Thomaston (LSD-28) conducted numerous troop and supply landings with small boats at Da Nang, Cam Ranh Bay, Song Co Chien River area, and Cua Viet River area from 1965 to 1972 [Note: no AO exposure for 1975 operations]

USS Point Defiance (LSD-31) conducted numerous troop and supply landings with small boats at Da Nang, Van Tuong, and Kien Hoa from May 1965 through October 1972
(see other category)

USS Alamo (LSD-33) conducted numerous troop, supply, and equipment landings with smaller boats at Da Nang, Vung Tau, Song Bo De, An Thoi, and Tan My between August 1964 and October 1972 (see other category)

USS Hermitage (LSD-34) conducted troop landings in Da Nang area from June through October 1967 (see other category)

USS Monticello (LSD-35) conducted numerous troop and supply landings at Chu Lai and elsewhere from October 1965-March 1966, February-September 1967, March1968-February 1969, February-September 1970, March 1971, November 1971, October-December 1972, and January 1973

USS Anchorage (LSD-36) transported troops and supplies to and from shore with smaller craft at Da Nang, Cam Ranh Bay, Vung Tau, and An Thoi from February 1970 through July 1972 (see other category)

USNS General W. H. Gordon (T-AP-117) [Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) Transport Ship] transported troops and cargo to Vung Tau and elsewhere in Vietnam, with crew members going ashore, during 1965 and from December 1967 to March 1968

USNS Barrett (T-AP-196) carried US Army 2nd Transportation Company to Qui Nhon during August 1965 and transported additional troops to Vietnam from April to December 1968 and January to May 1969

USNS Geiger (T-AP-197) transported troops to Qui Nhon and Vung Tau from September to December 1965 and additional troops to Vietnam January to February 1967 and July 1969

 

 Courtesy VA https://www.benefits.va.gov/compensation/claims-postservice-agent_orange.asp

Agent Orange Benefits for Blue Water Navy Veterans

House Approves Legislation for Agent Orange Benefits to Blue Water Navy Veterans

The U.S. House of Representatives voted unanimously 382-0 to grant Agent Orange Benefits for Blue Water Navy Veterans. On June 25, 2018, the House passed H.R. 299 – Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act of 2017 which would extend disability compensation benefits to Vietnam Veterans who served in the Navy on ships that were offshore. The legislation has now moved to the U.S. Senate where they will vote on it soon and President Trump is expected to sign it into law.

Courtesy Vietnam Veterans NewsPreviously, only veterans who had “boots on the ground” in Vietnam or served aboard Brown Water Navy ships were eligible to receive disability compensation benefits due to the presumption of exposure to Agent Orange (herbicides). Blue Water Navy Veterans were only eligible for Agent Orange benefits if the ship they served aboard was on the list of U.S. Navy and Coast Guard ships that operated in Vietnam.

The pending bill now grants service connection to veterans who served aboard any ship(s) that were stationed offshore the Republic of Vietnam.

Previously Denied VA Disability Claims

Blue Water Navy Veterans whose VA disability claims were previously denied based on exposure to Agent Orange will now have their prior claims approved. The bill states that an individual who meets the following criteria will be granted and earlier effective date of their claim:

(i) The veteran or survivor submitted a claim for disability compensation on or after September 25, 1985, and before January 1, 2019, for a disease covered by this section, and the claim was denied by reason of the claim not establishing that the disease was incurred or aggravated by the service of the veteran.

Otherwise, the following effective date of claim will apply:

(ii) The veteran or survivor submits a claim for disability compensation on or after January 1, 2019, for the same condition covered by the prior claim under clause (i), and the claim is approved pursuant to this section.

This means that if you do not have a claim that is currently pending a decision or on an appeal, you should file your VA disability claim(s) as soon as possible. Click here for a list of presumptive diseases associated with Agent Orange.

Please contact our office if you need assistance with your claim or appeal with Agent Orange Benefits for Blue Water Navy Veterans.

Developing…

 

New study pressures VA to expand Agent Orange compensation

Agent Orange Spraying

Army Chemical Corps Vietnam-Era Veterans Health Study

A new study linking exposure to herbicides and hypertension may establish eligibility for VA disability compensation for Agent Orange high blood pressure claims.

The Army Chemical Corps Vietnam-Era Veterans Health Study (2012-2013) was designed to learn if high blood pressure (hypertension) and some chronic respiratory diseases are related to herbicide exposure during the Vietnam War.

Latest update: Among U.S. Army Chemical Corps Veterans, VA researchers found an association between both hypertension risk and exposure to herbicides, and hypertension risk and military service in Vietnam. Other findings from this study will be published in the future.

Background

This study follows a request by former Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki for VA to conduct research on the association between herbicide exposure and high blood pressure (hypertension), as a basis for understanding if hypertension is related to military service in Vietnam.  VA is also interested in learning more about the relationship between herbicide exposure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

similar study was conducted between 1999-2000.

Goals

Researchers had two questions:

  1. Is the risk of high blood pressure (hypertension) related to Agent Orange exposure during service in Vietnam?
  2. Is the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including chronic bronchitis and emphysema, related to Agent Orange exposure during service in Vietnam?

Participants

Researchers asked approximately 4,000 Veterans who served in the U.S. Army Chemical Corps during the Vietnam era (1965-1973) to participate in this study.  Army Chemical Corps personnel were responsible for the maintenance and distribution or application of chemicals for military operations. Army Chemical Corps personnel who served in Vietnam during the Vietnam War constitute one of the largest groups of Vietnam Veterans who were thought to have had the greatest potential exposure to herbicides.

Presumptive Conditions

VA has recognized certain cancers and other health problems as presumptive diseases associated with exposure to Agent Orange or other herbicides during military service. Veterans and their survivors may be eligible for disability compensation or survivors’ benefits for these diseases: http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/agentorange/conditions/index.asp

If the VA concedes the findings of the study, hypertension would be added to the list of presumptive conditions which would allow veterans to file Agent Orange high blood pressure claims. At the time of implementation of a new ruling, any claims that are currently open or on appeal may be granted effective on the date of the claim.

– Source: http://www.publichealth.va.gov/epidemiology/studies/vietnam-army-chemical-corps.asp#sthash.Q9ZP6722.dpuf

Camp Lejeune Contaminated Water

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amended its adjudication regulations relating to presumptive service connection to add certain diseases associated with Camp Lejeune contaminated water from August 1, 1953 to December 31, 1987:

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2016/09/09/2016-21455/diseases-associated-with-exposure-to-contaminants-in-the-water-supply-at-camp-lejeune

This new rule establishes that veterans, former reservists, and former National Guard members, who served at Camp Lejeune for no less than 30 days (consecutive or nonconsecutive) during this period, and who have been diagnosed with any of eight associated diseases, are presumed to have a service-connected disability for purposes of entitlement to VA benefits.

Presumptive Diseases Due to Camp Lejeune Contaminated Water

  • Kidney cancer
  • Non Hodgkin’s Lymphoma
  • Adult Leukemia
  • Liver Cancer
  • Bladder Cancer
  • Multiple Myeloma
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Aplastic Anemia
  • Other Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Eligibility

VA will presume exposure to Camp Lejeune contaminated water for all active duty, reserve, and National Guard personnel who served for no less than 30 days (consecutive or nonconsecutive) at Camp Lejeune during the period beginning August 1, 1953, and ending on December 31, 1987. VA will include both consecutive and nonconsecutive days in the calculation of the 30-day requirement for veterans who may have served at Camp Lejeune on multiple occasions that total no less than 30 days.

Camp Lejeune Contaminated Water

This proposed rule covers any veteran, reservist, or member of the National Guard, whose military orders or records establish their presence within the borders of the entirety of the United States Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune border, which includes Marine Corps Air Station New River.

Pending VA Disability Compensation Claims

This rule applies to claims received by VA on or after the date of publication of the final rule in the Federal Register and to claims pending before VA for presumptive diseases related to Camp Lejeune contaminated water on that date. This proposed rule would not apply retroactively to claims previously adjudicated. A claim is considered to be adjudicated once a decision is made and the appeal period has expired. A claimant has one year from the notification date to appeal the decision before it becomes final.

 

 

Dependency & Indemnity Compensation (DIC)

Dependency & Indemnity Compensation (DIC) is a tax free monetary benefit paid to eligible survivors of military Servicemembers who died in the line of duty or eligible survivors of Veterans whose death resulted from a service-related injury or disease.

Bronze Star And Purple Heart

Eligibility (Surviving Spouse)

To qualify for DIC, a surviving spouse must meet the requirements below.

The surviving spouse was:

Married to a Servicemember who died on active duty, active duty for training, or inactive duty training, OR
Validly married the Veteran before January 1, 1957, OR
Married the Veteran within 15 years of discharge from the period of military service in which the disease or injury that caused the Veteran’s death began or was aggravated, OR
Was married to the Veteran for at least one year, OR
Had a child with the Veteran, AND
Cohabited with the Veteran continuously until the Veteran’s death or, if separated, was not at fault for the separation, AND
Is not currently remarried

Note: A surviving spouse who remarries on or after December 16, 2003, and on or after attaining age 57, is entitled to continue to receive DIC.
Eligibility (Surviving Child)

Not included on the surviving spouse’s DIC, AND
Unmarried, AND
Under age 18, or between the ages of 18 and 23 and attending school.

Evidence Required

Listed below are the evidence requirements for DIC:

The Servicemember died while on active duty, active duty for training, or inactive duty training, OR
The Veteran died from an injury or disease deemed to be related to military service, OR
The Veteran died from a non service-related injury or disease, but was receiving, OR was entitled to receive, VA Compensation for service-connected disability that was rated as totally disabling
For at least 10 years immediately before death, OR
Since the Veteran’s release from active duty and for at least five years immediately preceding death, OR
For at least one year before death if the Veteran was a former prisoner of war who died after September 30, 1999

Effective Date

For claims based on death in service, the effective will be the first day of the month in which the death actually or was presumed to have occurred.

  • If the death occurred after service and the claim is received within one year of the Veteran’s death, the effective date will be the first day of the month in which the Veterans died.
  • If the death occurred after service and the claim is received after one year of the Veteran’s death, the effective date is the date of receipt of claim.

Courtesy of www.va.gov

Filing a VA Disability Claim

Filing a VA disability claim? Here is what you need to know.

Service connected disability compensation is a benefit that is exactly what it sounds like: it’s compensation for a current disability that occurred as a result of your active duty service. In order to be successful and have your disability claim approved, you are going to have to satisfy three requirements:

  1. Diagnosis of a current disability
  2. An event or stressor that occurred during your active duty service
  3. A “nexus” or connection between the in service event and the currently diagnosed disability.

Diagnosis: you must have a condition that is currently diagnosed by a doctor in order to have a disability. A common mistake is to claim a condition that occurred during service, but currently is not disabling. For example, if you broke your ankle on active duty but it healed completely with no residual effects, then you cannot claim a disability for the ankle. Another one is Agent Orange. Although you may have been exposed to Agent Orange while serving in Vietnam, if you do not have a currently diagnosed condition that was caused by Agent Orange, then you do not have a VA disability claim. Exposure itself to Agent Orange is not a disability.

In service event: there must have been something that occurred on active duty service that caused the current disability, or the condition started while you were on active duty and has been chronic and continues to this day. For example, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is caused by a stressful event, or stressor, that happened while you served such as being directly involved in combat.

The complaint of the condition must be documented in your Service Treatment Records, or a stressor that is proven through other means such as witness statements.

Nexus: A nexus is the connection between the event that happened in service and the currently diagnosed disability. A nexus can be provided by a VA examiner from a C&P exam, or an independent medical opinion from a private doctor with specific knowledge of the diagnosed disability. For example, if you were treated for a knee injury in service and you continued to have chronic problems with it up until the present time, then you have a disability claim for a knee condition if it’s diagnosed.

Presumptive conditions: presumptive conditions are those conditions where you do not need to provide a nexus between the in service event and the current condition; the VA automatically presumes the event caused the disability.

Agent Orange is the biggest presumptive condition for a VA disability claim. If you set foot on the ground in Vietnam during the war, then you are automatically presumed to have been exposed to Agent Orange. If you are diagnosed with one or more of the presumptive conditions, such as ischemic heart disease, Parkinson’s disease, or Diabetes Mellitus, Type II, then the VA presumes that exposure to Agent Orange caused the disabilities.

For Gulf War veterans who served on active duty in the Southwest Asia theater of military operations, there is a presumption of service connection for certain medically unexplained chronic multisymptom illnesses. These conditions include: fatigue, headaches, joint pain, indigestion, insomnia, dizziness, respiratory disorders, and memory problems. A complete list is also available at vetdisabilityaid.com.

For PTSD claims, if you were awarded a Combat Action Ribbon or Combat Infantryman Badge, then you do not need to provide a stressor, it’s automatically presumed because of your involvement in combat.

army-combat-infantryman-badge
Combat Infantryman Badge
Combat Action Ribbon
Combat Action Ribbon

VA Appeals Process

So, after all the hard work involved with replying to the VA’s requests for more records and for enduring one or more Compensation and Pension, or C&P, exams, you get a notification letter from the VA where they deny your claim or don’t rate your disability high enough. Welcome to the VA appeals process. It can be very frustrating and you may feel like giving up, but don’t take “No” for an answer and know your rights about appealing the decision.

The first thing that you will want to do in the VA appeals process is to file a Notice of Disagreement, or NOD, with the decision. This is the first step in appealing the denial or improper rating. Don’t delay though, because you only have one year from the date of the VA’s decision letter in order to file an NOD. Otherwise, you lose your right to appeal and the decision becomes final.

Two very common and disturbing mistakes is for a veteran to file a reconsideration or later file a reopen of the claim, instead of appealing the decision. If someone, whether it be a VA representative or Veteran Service Officer, advises you to file a reopen or reconsideration instead of an appeal, they may not be looking out for your best interests. Don’t let them scare or intimidate you when they say that the VA appeals process will take much longer and be much harder to get approved. Reopens and reconsiderations require you to submit new and material evidence, and you stand the chance of losing your back pay as well.

VA Appeals Process
VA Appeals Process. Courtesy: VA

DRO Hearing

What happens if the VA made a mistake with the evidence that you already submitted with the original claim? It doesn’t matter if you don’t appeal it. The better way to go is to file an NOD and request a DRO Hearing. This is where a Decision Review Officer, or DRO, takes a fresh look at the claim and disregards the previous decision to see if there were any errors made, and new evidence can also be submitted. Often, a DRO will find an error and approve a claim based on existing evidence that was already submitted – this would not be possible with a reopen or reconsideration.

If the DRO continues the previous decision on the claim, then a Statement of the Case, or SOC, is issued. The SOC will explain in detail what the issues are and why the claim was denied or rated accordingly. You will have 60 days from the date of the SOC to file a VA Form 9 to formalize the appeal so that it can be certified to the Board of Veterans’ Appeals, or BVA, in Washington DC. When filing your Form 9, the quickest way to get a hearing date is to request a live videoconference before the BVA.

VA Appeals Process Wait Times

The VA appeals process and initial claims waiting times are published weekly in the Monday Morning Workload Report.

  • NODs at the Regional Office: 404 days
  • Form 9s at the BVA: 567 days

 

NOD vs Reconsideration / Reopen

What route should you take with your denied VA disability claim: NOD vs reconsideration / reopen? Make sure that you know the facts before you make a decision.

First, I want to say upfront that I advise filing an NOD 99% of the time. Let’s start out by talking about the advantages of an appeal instead of a reconsideration or reopen. When you file an NOD, you also want to elect to have a “de novo” review performed by a Decision Review Officer (DRO). A DRO is an experienced supervisor who will take a fresh look at the claim and set aside the previous decision that was made. The DRO has the ability to approve the claim based on the evidence that was already submitted if he/she found that a mistake was made in the previous decision, and new evidence can also be submitted with the NOD for the DRO to consider. If the decision is favorable and the claim is approved, the effective date will be the original date of claim and the veteran will be paid retroactively to that date.

Now, let’s talk about the advantages of requesting a reconsideration / reopen of a previously denied claim instead of filing an NOD. There is only one advantage, and it is at best just a slightly better possible outcome: timing. We all know how long it takes the VA to do anything and chances are that you had to wait a very long time to even get the first bad decision on your claim. When you talk to an ill-informed VA representative or Veteran Service Officer about filing an NOD, they will try their hardest to have you file a reconsideration / reopen the claim at a later date. They will say that it will take several years for your appeal to go through and that a reconsideration / reopen is much quicker, but that may not necessarily be accurate. About 80-85% of the NODs that I submit get approved by the DRO at the Regional Office level within about a year, which is the same timeframe as a reconsideration.

This leads us to the disadvantages of an NOD. If the DRO continues the denial after conducting a de novo review, then the claim goes to the Board of Veterans Appeals (BVA) in Washington DC, and it may in fact take several years for the decision. One other factor to consider when filing an NOD is that you only have one year from the date of the decision to file a Notice of Disagreement. So as long as you are within a year from a denial, you should go ahead with the NOD. Otherwise, your only other option would be to reopen the claim if the denial is more than a year old.

When we look at the disadvantages of filing a reconsideration / reopen, the facts tell the real story. Probably the most important issue is evidence. If you have a claim that was denied, then you must submit new and material evidence in order for the claim to be reconsidered or reopened. What if the you submitted all of the necessary evidence with the original claim and it was still denied? If you file an NOD, the DRO may find that a mistake was made and the evidence that was submitted was overlooked or improperly evaluated, and the claim could be approved. With a reconsideration or reopen, you don’t have this option and unless you have something new and material to offer, you will not be successful and the claim will remain denied.

Most importantly, you stand to lose out on a significant amount of back pay when you file a reconsideration or reopen. If the claim is approved, the effective date will be the date that you submitted the new and material evidence. With an NOD, the effective date is the original date of claim. In some cases, this may be several years worth of retroactive pay.

An ill-informed VA representative or Veteran Service Officer (VSO) may try to discourage you from filing NOD, and they will try their hardest to have you file a reconsideration or reopen of the claim instead. They do not always have your best interests in mind.

I am working with a Veteran who was talked into withdrawing his NOD by a VSO and filing a reconsideration. As a result, it cost him over $46,000 in back pay!

Losing money with a reconsideration

Remember, don’t let anyone persuade you to do something that isn’t in your own best interests.

 

VA Aid & Attendance

The VA Aid & Attendance Benefit is a non-service connected pension available to wartime veterans and their surviving spouses to help with long-term care expenses including assisted living and in-home care.

Eligibility for VA Aid & Attendance:

1. Military:

Veteran had 90 days active of service with one day during a qualified war period:

a. World War II: December 7, 1941, through December 31, 1946, inclusive. If the veteran was in service on December 31, 1946, continuous service before July 26, 1947, is considered World War II service.
b. Korean Conflict: June 27, 1950, through January 31, 1955, inclusive.
c. Vietnam Era: February 28, 1961, and ending on August 5, 1964, in the case of a veteran who served in the Republic of Vietnam (“in country”). Otherwise, all inclusive from August 6, 1964 through May 7, 1975.

2. Medical:

Claimant (applicant) must be in need of aid and attendance (assistance) from another person with (2) Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) from the following: bathing or showering, dressing, eating, getting in and out of bed or a chair, and using the toilet.

3. Financial:

Each candidate is evaluated on a case-by case basis for qualification.

a. Income: the person must be spending a majority of their income to qualify for the benefit. Medical expenses may be deducted against income to qualify. Income includes: social security, any pensions, long-term care insurance benefits, annuity payments, and interest & dividends. A candidate must be spending all of their income on care expenses in order to receive the maximum benefit amount.

b. Assets: there is no specific limit for qualifying. Factors such as age, marital status, health condition, and income are used to determine the net worth limit.

4. Benefit Rates:

The VA Aid & Attendance benefit is paid on a tax-free monthly basis directly to the veteran or spouse. These rates may increase annually.

Married Veteran: $2,169
Single Veteran: $1,830
Unremarried Surviving Spouse: $1,176

VA Aid & Attendance Recipients

 

 

 

 

 

5. Required Supporting Documentation:

a. Original/certified copy of vet’s military discharge (DD214): www.archives.gov
b. Asset Verification: most recent bank & investment account statement(s)
c. Income Verification: Social Security, pension, disability income statement(s)
d. For Married Veterans and Surviving Spouses: copy of marriage certificate, documentation of previous marriages
e. For Surviving Spouses only: copy of veteran’s death certificate

For the Department of Veterans Affairs guide to pension and representation for VA Aid & Attendance claims click here.

Agent Orange Disability Claims

Agent Orange Claims: Were You Denied?

Veterans who served in Vietnam and “in country” even if only for a day, were exposed to Agent Orange. Brown Water Navy Veterans and Blue Water Navy Veterans who came ashore were also exposed to Agent Orange, as well as many others who served during the Vietnam Era.

Helicopter spraying agent orange

Presumption of Exposure to Agent Orange

If you served “boots on the ground” in Vietnam and you now have an Agent Orange presumptive disease, then you must be awarded service connected disability compensation. Period.

Know your rights when it comes to Agent Orange disability claims.

Veterans’ Diseases Associated with Agent Orange

VA assumes that certain diseases can be related to a Veteran’s qualifying military service. These are called “presumptive diseases.”

VA has recognized certain cancers and other health problems as presumptive diseases associated with exposure to Agent Orange or other herbicides during military service. Veterans and their survivors may be eligible for disability compensation or survivors’ benefits for these diseases:

  • AL Amyloidosis
    A rare disease caused when an abnormal protein, amyloid, enters tissues or organs
  • Chronic B-cell Leukemias
    A type of cancer which affects white blood cells
  • Chloracne (or similar acneform disease)
    A skin condition that occurs soon after exposure to chemicals and looks like common forms of acne seen in teenagers. Under VA’s rating regulations, it must be at least 10 percent disabling within one year of exposure to herbicides.
  • Diabetes Mellitus Type 2
    A disease characterized by high blood sugar levels resulting from the body’s inability to respond properly to the hormone insulin
  • Hodgkin’s Disease
    A malignant lymphoma (cancer) characterized by progressive enlargement of the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen, and by progressive anemia
  • Ischemic Heart Disease
    A disease characterized by a reduced supply of blood to the heart, that leads to chest pain
  • Multiple Myeloma
    A cancer of plasma cells, a type of white blood cell in bone marrow
  • Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma
    A group of cancers that affect the lymph glands and other lymphatic tissue
  • Parkinson’s Disease
    A progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects muscle movement
  • Peripheral Neuropathy, Acute and Subacute
    A nervous system condition that causes numbness, tingling, and motor weakness. Currently, it must be at least 10 percent disabling within one year of herbicide exposure and resolve within two years. VA proposed on Aug. 10, 2012, to replace “acute and subacute” with “early-onset” and eliminate the requirement that symptoms resolve within two years.
  • Porphyria Cutanea Tarda
    A disorder characterized by liver dysfunction and by thinning and blistering of the skin in sun-exposed areas. Under VA’s rating regulations, it must be at least 10 percent disabling within one year of exposure to herbicides.
  • Prostate Cancer
    Cancer of the prostate; one of the most common cancers among men
  • Respiratory Cancers (includes lung cancer)
    Cancers of the lung, larynx, trachea, and bronchus
  • Soft Tissue Sarcomas (other than osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, Kaposi’s sarcoma, or mesothelioma)
    A group of different types of cancers in body tissues such as muscle, fat, blood and lymph vessels, and connective tissues

Children with Birth Defects: VA presumes certain birth defects in children of Vietnam and Korea Veterans associated with Veterans’ qualifying military service.

Veterans with ALS: VA presumes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) diagnosed in all Veterans who had 90 days or more continuous active military service is related to their service, although ALS is not related to Agent Orange exposure.

Source: U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs

38% Error Rate at VA

The VA acknowledges it makes mistakes on 14 percent of disability claims – an error rate the agency considers unacceptable and has pledged to all but eliminate by 2015.

A CIR analysis of 18 audits published this year by the VA’s inspector general shows the problem could be much worse, especially in high-profile cases. The analysis found a 38 percent average error rate for claims involving disabilities like traumatic brain injury and illnesses linked to the Vietnam-era defoliant Agent Orange…more

Exposure to Agent Orange by Location

Part of the United States’ strategy in Vietnam was to conduct an herbicide program to remove foliage providing cover for the enemy. Agent Orange was the most widely used of the herbicide combinations sprayed.

Agent Orange and other herbicides used in Vietnam were tested or stored elsewhere, including some military bases in the United States…more

Institute of Medicine Reports on Agent Orange

VA contracts with the IOM of the National Academy of Sciences, a nongovernmental organization, to scientifically review evidence on the long-term health effects of Agent Orange and other herbicides on Vietnam Veterans. IOM determines whether the evidence points to a statistically valid association that would suggest or establish a relationship between diseases studied and herbicide use…more